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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 8, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11.003m. president trump will announce later whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal. bridging the generational divide — a call for all 25—year—olds to be given £10,000 pounds each and for working pensioners to pay more towards the nhs. rail companies begin a public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use. are you ready to resign? borisjohnson describes one of downing street's for customs controls after brexit as "crazy". also... the spider with a spring in its step. scientists train this spider to jump on demand to help them design mini—robots with the same acrobatic ability. and divine inspiration at this year's met gala — the stars grace new york's biggest social event of the year with outfits based on religion, and the pope. good morning.
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it's tuesday 8 may. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. president trump has announced on twitter that he'll reveal later today whether the united states is to abandon the iran nuclear deal. there's speculation he may say the us will only partially pull out of the accord. the deal was signed by iran and the us, the uk, russia, france, china, germany and the eu in 2015. an agreement was reached to ensure iran's nuclear programme would be "exclusively peaceful". but opponents of the deal — such as israel — have accused the iranian regime of lying about their nuclear capabilities. president trump has called
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the deal "insane" and will announce later today whether he wants the us to pull out. iran says it wants to maintain constructive relations with the world. the foreign secretary borisjohnson went to washington at the weekend, where he argued for president trump to keep the status quo. we think that's what you can do is be tougher on enron, addressed the concerns of the president, and not throw the baby out the bath water. 0ur correspondent paul adams explains how the iran nuclear deal reduced tensions between the islamic republic and the west. is the nuclear deal about to be called off? it came after years of tension over iran's alleged efforts to build a bomb. iran had always said its programme was peaceful, but no one believed this, and for almost ten years, the un imposed sanctions.
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the deal brought together the five permanent numbers of the un security council and the eu. it was called the joint comprehensive plan of action. the jcpoa. so, what exactly was in it? iran agreed to do away with large part of its nuclear programme, and allow international inspectors to monitor the rest. this involved giving up large stockpiles of enriched uranium, and thousands of centrifuges. as a result, experts believed it would take iran much longer to make a bomb in the future. up from 2—3 months to around a year, giving the international community much more time to respond to a crisis. in return, the international community agreed to lift sanctions. iran could recover billions of pounds of frozen assets. it could sell more oil on the international market, and trade like a normal country. iran is sticking to its side of the bargain, but the deal has always had its critics. israel and saudi arabia say that it isn't tough enough.
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israel's prime minister in particular says that iran should not be trusted. iran lied. donald trump says it's the worst deal in the world. the iran deal was one of the worst and most one—sided transaction i have ever seen drawn by anybody ever, ever. he has been threatening to walk away, unless what he sees as the deal‘s flaws can be fixed. so, what are these perceived flaws, and can they be fixed? well, for one thing, many of the deal‘s key provisions expire after ten, 15 or even 25 years. for some, this is a problem. nor does the deal address iran's ballistic missile programme. or what many regard as its increasingly aggressive behaviour around the middle east, in places like syria and yemen. it's more and more clear that the us administration is likely to withdraw sanctions against iran.
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what it means in practice, this deal remains to be seen, we do not know whether the action of the europeans will be, we don't know what the actions of russia and china will be, and most importantly, we don't know what the actions of iran will be. no one quite knows what mr trump has in mind, but if he does make good on his threat, the deal‘s other backers have a problem. do they try and keep it alive by themselves, or pressure iran into accepting new conditions. if that happens, iran, too, could walk away. paul adams, bbc news. 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels. given the representations made to donald trump, to try and persuade him to stay in this deal, what is the mood they‘ re? him to stay in this deal, what is
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the mood they're? deep concern, i would say. a lot of worry right across the european union and here in brussels, because what they say is that this deal has been working, and that it took years to negotiate, it was very carefully put together, they said, it resulted in, as paul was explaining, a dismantling of iran's nuclear programmes, which we re iran's nuclear programmes, which were getting to the point where it was getting close to having the capabilities to produce nuclear weapons, the eu side say what has been put in place instead it intrusive inspections, they have been able to going to now and dismantle the monitor —— and monitor secret underground sites, which they say could potentially be lost. they say could potentially be lost. they say that this is worth keeping, it has worked, iran has kept inside of the bargain. there is some frustration, because they believe lifting of sanctions and investment
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hasn't all flowed to iran, but the eu say that they would try and keep all this in place, to keep the deal there. those other aspects that paul was was talking about, the missile programmes that iran has, involved and in other countries, a destabilising factors in other countries in the region, those are all text at —— separate issues that could be dealt with separately by gauging with iran. just looking at it in gauging with iran. just looking at itina gauging with iran. just looking at it in a little more detail, to the other signatories of the deal feel that if they are more than willing to stick with the deal, that they can counteract some of the negative effects of the us, either pulling out entirely or partially? the difficulty is that they don't believe, or they think it would be difficult to keep the deal alive. first of all, they say, even just the talk coming from the us side has had a chilling effect on investments into arana. that has dampened ——
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iran. that has dampened the iranians had. if you just pulls back and leaves it to the europeans to try and negotiate tougher new conditions, that might allow them to continue some sort of support. but european side say, one aspect that is not discussed march, is that the consequences within iran, because within iran, there are different camps, the rugby hardliners who never liked this deal at all, and the president, who won considerable electoral support on the promise of the sanctions boeing. it has not happened, and if the deal ends, it could seriously weaken his position, could seriously weaken his position, could seriously weaken his position, could seriously undermine that side of the argument in iran, strengthen the argument of hardliners. if iran then rev withdrew, what the european side fear, is iran's having an armed
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raised with destabilising consequences. they see real concerns about his going forward into the future. thank you very much. damien in brussels. just a reminder, at 7pm tonight our time, we will be getting that news from washington about whether donald trump has decided to stick with the iran nuclear deal, and we will have full coverage for you. a group looking at the economic differences between old and young people has recommended that 25—year—olds should receive a £10,000 payment, and working pensioners should contribute more to the nhs. the resolution foundation's intergenerational commission claims radical reforms are needed to stop under—30s having a poorer life than their parents. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity reports. a family gathering in cannock, staffordshire, on the left, stephanie garden was born into the post—war baby—boom generation that enjoyed higher incomes and more wealth than their parents.
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her daughter karen, who is 48 hoped for the same but her grandson dan, born in the 1990s has been dealt afarweaker hand. dan's age—group earn no more than the same age group 15 years ago. they are half as likely to own a home at 30 and four times as likely to rent privately. while many pensioners are poor, on average, those drawing the state pension have higher incomes than they have ever had. after housing costs, they are higher than for people of working age. yet, if they work, pensioners pay no national insurance. there are inevitable pressures for public spending to go up on healthcare and social care. and it is reasonable to expect the baby boomers, who have a very substantial part of the nation's wealth, to make that contribution towards meeting those costs, especially as it will be for services from which they themselves directly benefit. among the commission's recommendations are 2.3 billion more for the nhs, paid for by national insurance on pensioners' earnings
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and all 25—year—olds will get a £10,000 citizens inheritance which could be paid for by scrapping inheritance tax and instead taxing large cash gifts. i don't think the young ones today have got it as easy as what some people think. i think it's quite difficult for them. politicians don't like annoying the grey vote but the intergenerational commission says that to close the financial generation gap, something has to be done. andy verity, bbc. borisjohnson has described one of the government's post—brexit customs proposals as "crazy". in an interview with the daily mail, the foreign secretary said one of the ideas downing street is considering for a customs deal with the eu would stop britain taking back control of trade. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in downing street. good morning to you, norman. i
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suppose, how could the government get some sort of policy out of this if borisjohnson get some sort of policy out of this if boris johnson on get some sort of policy out of this if borisjohnson on the brexiteers it isn't for barging? and then you have your remainers in government, those in favour of a so—called soft brexit is not for barging either?|j think brexit is not for barging either?” think the truth is mrs may is now facing a very difficult moment in terms of brexit and overnight boris johnson has significantly raised the sta kes, johnson has significantly raised the stakes, because we knew already that the brexiteers have pretty much drawn a red line on this issue, but borisjohnson has actually gone quite a bit farther, because when there are disagreements among cabinet ministers, convention as they are by and large tie and thrash out in agreed position behind closed doors. not so borisjohnson. he has, publicly trashed one of the options being looked at by mrs may, the option that she appears to prefer. this idea of a customs partnership, and which we would collect eu
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ta riffs and which we would collect eu tariffs coming into britain en route to the eu. that would not mean taking back control, borisjohnson says, because we would be collecting money on behalf of the eu, and implement eu rules on border checks, and therefore, in his view, it is crazy. that prompted question, how can he then advocates that policy, if that is the policy which mrs may eventually settles on, and can he actually remain in government if thatis actually remain in government if that is the policy raises major users. he was pressed about it this morning, but no surprises, no a nswe i’s. morning sir. if the brexit plan is that crazy, are you ready to resign? morning sir. we are told that they did not discuss it at cabinet today. mrs may's bridging to delay any final
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decision until she is confident she can win it. borisjohnson came out again and avoided discussions about whether he is shaking up to quit cabinet, but there is no disguising the fact that amongst the brexiteers, they are determined to make a stand on this issue. we know that they sent that 60 page report to mrs may last weekend, underlining their objections. we had their leader, jacob rees—mogg describing the plans as gratton is, and this morning, again, the former tory leader, iain duncan smith saying that she would have to drop the whole idea. i do not see the point in carrying on with this process. it is clear that anybody who knows anything about export it and deals oi'i anything about export it and deals on exports, that this does not work, and that therefore the best thing to do is to do the maximum facilitation, which is basically, what we have at the moment for our exports, but enhanced attic he using new technology and new process. that will take some to development, yes,
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but it is based on what we do at the moment, and not inventing a new system. it is the best position to be in, because it is likely that we will be ready to do that, and even if it is not completely developed, we will still be able to import export goods, because these is the more it exists. that other system does not exist. leave aside the problem of what to do about boris, mrs may house to find a way of getting this preferred option —— mrs may have to find a way of getting this preferred option through the brexit subcommittee, and then through cabinet. the strategy seems to be, delay in part, and also reworking the proposals to make it more palatable, and hoping that some of the members of the brexit committee, who are not the sort of hardline brexiteers, committee, who are not the sort of ha rdline brexiteers, can committee, who are not the sort of hardline brexiteers, can be swayed onto the side of theresa may. perhaps, people like gavin williamson, or sergey davitt, the new home secretary, have both that
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remain during brexit, and that seems to be the hope of team made. thank you very much, for that. the headlines on bbc news. president trump will announce later whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal. bridging the generational divide — a call for 25—year—olds to be given £10,000 — and for working pensioners to pay more towards the nhs. rail companies begin a public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use. in sport, a fairy tale ending for mark williams, after he gained another title. he beatjohn higgins, another title. he beatjohn higgins, a classic at crucible, and he becomes the oldest champion 30 years ago. koscielny will be out until at least december. the defender was
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injured 12 minutes into the side's europa league defeat by atletico madrid last thursday. tony bellew has told the bbc that he is unsure whether he will ever fight again. but he admits he attempted to play a match with tyson fury. will be back with more at half past 11. rail companies are proposing a shake—up of the current fares system to make it simplerfor consumers. the rail delivery group — which represents the industry — says there are around 55 million ticket prices in the current system. it admits customers are not always offered the cheapest ticket available because of the complexity. earlier robert nisbet from the rail delivery group explained why the system needs to be overhauled. regulations were set in stone back in the 1990s, over 20 years ago when things were very very different.
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we didn't really have smartphones. there were more pagers than there were smartphones. and now of course our lifestyles are far more flexible. many of us work from home more, or we are self—employed. and so we want it to be simpler and easierfor customers when they go to, say, a ticket machine like here at liverpool street, or they pay for a ticket on their phone that they are going to get the cheapest fare for the journey that they are about to make. and we think that is right to establish trust with customers that they trust the system and they know they are going to get the cheapest fare. 0ur correspondent leigh milner is at london liverpool street station this morning. so, with those 55 million, rather mind—boggling fair combinations available, it is no surprise that is ripe foran available, it is no surprise that is ripe for an overhaul? certainly. i think it is there to say that for
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most of these rail fares either confusing or very expensive, and for the first time since privatisation, rail companies across the country have launched a public consultation to make that process much simpler, much easier, and hopefully much cheaper. the industry admits passengers are not currently offers the cheapest fare available due to long—standing anomaly such as split ticketing web people pay for a number of tickets and sellerjust one. i have been looking on the internet this morning, for example, you can buy in advance ticket from london kings cross to sheffield, for today, the 7th ofjuly, leaving at 7am, and that will cost you £32, but if you bought 2—mac separate tickets going from london kings cross to doncaster, and then to sheffield, it will cost you £18. that is a saving of 15%. you'll get there earlier. with me is the chief executive for transport focus,, what
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you make of this consultation? we are pleased that it has kicked off. passengers the years have been telling us, especially for your longer distance fares, they find it confusing, they don't feel it is value for money. this ability to... what changes do we need? we need a fundamental look at how the system works, how big government regulation pays into this, and how we get the best outcome for most passengers, so that it best outcome for most passengers, so thatitis best outcome for most passengers, so that it is balanced. we have been talking about is the years, when will we actually see any change at all? this consultation will produce options on the table by the end of the year, they will be put in front of government, and hopefully will start to season changes in the next 12 to 18 months, this has got to happen. i have been speaking to a few passengers today about some of their ideas, and how it could be simpler and easier to find cheaper tickets. they all told me then it's bea
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tickets. they all told me then it's be a comparative website, and actually speaking to the rail delivery group groups today, that was one of the options. another option could include integrated tickets between buses and trains and trams. the consultation begins next month and will run until september. those proposals will be submitted the government in autumn, and who knows what will actually see this change is being made, though. 0k, thank you very much. more now on recommendations from a think tank that radical reform is needed to prevent today's under—30s from having a significantly poorer life than their parents. i'm joined now by kate bell from trade union organisation, the tuc. this intergenerational contract, or social contract, if you like, it is about younger generation is doing better than the generations that went before, or at least not doing worse. what you think of this idea
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of offering all 25 rods £10,000, is this going to somehow level the playing field? i think we have got a situation where young people have been at the sharp end of some of the changes that have been happening in society, and our labour market, low pay and contacts, and in some cases less luck with pensions. i think the idea around citizens in heritage that young people isjust idea around citizens in heritage that young people is just one of a range of ideas that we need to make sure that young people feel that they have a stake in society, that they have a stake in society, that they have a fair chance, that everybody is benefiting from the social contract we have. so, the tuc is talking about a new deal for young but also about intergenerational solidarity. how do you kind of shift the balance in favour of young people without causing resentment, or perhaps even hardship among the generations? absolutely. this is not about pitting young against old. we know that in families across the country,
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people are having these discussions, pa rents a re people are having these discussions, parents are helping their children safe for a house, many people are helping care for their parents. this is something that people are managing all of the time, and what we took him out, here, is how we make sure that the state, the labour market, or the housing market also bought that sense of intergenerational solidarity. this idea of asking pensioners contributing national insurance towards the nhs, of course some tensioners is working because they enjoy their work, but i am sure a lot of them are working because they can't afford to retire, so could they afford to pay these national insurance contributions? kamara this is an independent report, so we will wa nt to is an independent report, so we will want to discuss the prisons with our unions and with our embers. gunner think it is right that we think about how the campaign for the and social care that opened a generations need. making sure that people retire when you need to, and that they can get the pensions that they need. and briefly, kate, if you would, there is going to be a lot of
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political will needed, that any of these proposals to come to some sort of fruition, to make a change. absolutely. and i think it is important that we have this kind of consultation, but i think lots of people recognise that the labour party is not —— labour market is not working, and young people are not getting the chances they deserve. the idea ofjumping spiders might make some of us squirm — but scientists at university of manchester have taught one special arachnid to leap on command, to try to learn more about her acrobatic ability. if you're not a fan of our eight—legged friends, you might want to look away now... this is kim, a regaljumping spider — a species famed for its ability to leap. researchers hope that studying kim's movements will give them insight into how these creatures are able propel themselves up to six times' their body length. 0ur science correspondent helen briggs
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is here to tell us more. i think this is a rather fabulous story, helen, but first of all, how do you actually begin to go about training a spider? it is a very, very good question. i asked the scientists that. they got a number of spidersjust from scientists that. they got a number of spiders just from a pet shop, and they build in a lab these of take—off and landing platforms for them, and they just take—off and landing platforms for them, and theyjust put them on the take—off platform. them, and theyjust put them on the ta ke—off platform. they them, and theyjust put them on the take—off platform. they wanted them tojump so take—off platform. they wanted them to jump so they could film them. not many of the spiders oblige, but this little spider who they nicknamed, kim, just seem to lovejumping, so they were able to build an obstacle course for her, really, to see how she leapt through the air. it has given them really important information about how these incredible tiny little creatures are able to do that. at what was
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fascinating about the study comment was that kim used differentjumping strategies depending on the talent as she was presented with? these are jumping spiders, so imagine being present with a huge spider at about to pounce on you, so that is what they do. she is cleverfor a spider. she works it with ashley to get a big high deep, or if are slowly to get the spider. to snare —— to snare her brave. it is about genetic and energy, so that you can conserve her energy, so that you can conserve her energy by doing lower energyjobs, when she really needs to pounce fast, she can do this low trajectory. so ultimately, what is the purpose of studying with? we are looking to developing new generation of robots. some of these scientists are aeronautical engineers, they build aeroplanes, starting to study guide and flapping robots, but they wa nted guide and flapping robots, but they wanted tiny jumping robot,
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guide and flapping robots, but they wanted tinyjumping robot, maybe for pest control. they are looking at things like grasshoppers, fleas and jumping spiders, who seem to have the incredible jumps of little creatures like that. fascinating, helen, thank you very much. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather... here's simon king. we have got another hot and sunny day for eastern part of the uk. the pitches up to about 20 degrees. but further north and west, things are a little bit cloudy. you have got some rain moving its way through from northern ireland into the west of scotland, into north—west england and north wales. as well, we will see some sunny spells developing in northern ireland, toured central and eastern parts. that is where you will see the sunshine. 0ne eastern parts. that is where you will see the sunshine. one or two showers possible, here. temperatures
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are to 25 or 20 degrees. further north, temperatures certainly down from what they were over the bank holiday weekend. into wednesday, some of starts, some sunshine, and the cloud increasing from the west, and with that some rain moving from northern ireland to scotland, and eventually westbridge of england and wales. by unit of those temperatures again down. northern areas, even across the south—east, 19—21. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. president trump is to announce today whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal. bridging the generational gap — calls to give 25—year—olds £10,000 each and for working pensioners to pay more towards the nhs. britain's rail companies are to launch a public consultation in an effort to make ticketing fairer and easierfor all. and...
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foreign secretary borisjohnson attacks the prime minister's plan for customs controls after brexit. in a moment... a group of women fighting to protect zimbabwe's animals and reputation as a wildlife destination. sport now with holly hamilton. thank you, we start with world champion mark williams, who said he thought his career had ended five yea rs thought his career had ended five years ago before he claimed his third title at the crushable last night. he beatjohn higgins 18—16 in a thrilling final to become the old est world a thrilling final to become the oldest world snooker champion for a0 yea rs. oldest world snooker champion for a0 years. his last title was in 2003. the welshman fails to even qualify for the championship last year but this season he has won the northern ireland open and the german masters. he says he can't explain the turnaround. to think i'm going to have a season like this next season
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is probably a bit silly of me to think i will carry on this form, and the run. but you know, if i turn up next season and i played like an absolute fish, then i can't grumble. this season has just made up for the last 15 years of playing absolute garbage! for higgins, a case of another missed opportunity. the scotsman has now lost three finals winning the last of his four titles in 2011. i had an unbelievable amount of respect forjimmy white is amount of respect forjimmy white is a player but for him to come back six times and losing six finals, and still being a class act on and off the table, that's me i've lost into finals and it's heartbreaking but having to do that, i can only imagine what he went through, coming back every year, going again, again, and again. it's tough, it's tough. three days after knocking at david haye to win the 30th fight of his
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career, heavyweight tony bellew says he is torn over whether to walk away from the spot. he says his wife wa nts to from the spot. he says his wife wants to retire that he feels in the best form of his life and is tempted by talk of applied against former heavyweight world champion tyson fury, who has of course announced his comeback to the ring. everyone wa nts to his comeback to the ring. everyone wants to see me face guys i can't beat and when you tell me i can't beat and when you tell me i can't beat them it's beat and when you tell me i can't beat them its music to my ears, i wa nt to beat them its music to my ears, i want to do and even more. it is not a punch—up, the only thing he has over me is size, height and weight. i have speed, power and a better boxing brain than him. arsenal captain laurent koscielny will be out for at least six months after surgery on a ruptured achilles tendon. manager arsene wenger confirmed this earlier, describing the defender is devastated. he sustained the injury during last thursday's europa league semifinal
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exit at atletico madrid. if ever a game was made for the footballing cliche, the relegation six pointer, it is tonight ‘s clash between swa nsea it is tonight ‘s clash between swansea and southampton. swansea offered bottom with the visitors just one place above them. —— swa nsea just one place above them. —— swansea a third from bottom. both are tied on 33 points and a win for either could be decisive and would also relegate west brom. whenever you are in this situation you want to be able to damage the teams around you and clearly swansea are very much the team we have to damage. i want to find something in the game, make a big impact, my players play better away from home andl players play better away from home and i believe we will stay in the premier —— my players play better atom. eddie jones will respond to england's poor six nations showing by bringing in a new attacking coach of the tour of south africa, he's to announce his squad with increasing calls for danny cipriani to be included. eddiejones will also need a new captain for the trip with
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regular skipper dylan hartley out with concussion. he's been involved in the planning of the tour, and we just wish a good recovery now. do you think he will come back? no reason why he can't. it seems nature ru ns reason why he can't. it seems nature runs its course with head injuries, and we have to be guarded by the medical staff but he has the motivation and the intent and the comebacks in a reason why he can't. all being well do you see him coming back as england captain? will have to wait and see, i don't think we need to make a decision on that now. speaking to chrisjones there. that's all the sport, 0lly foster will have more in the next hour. thank you. more now on the news that president trump will announce later whether the united states is withdrawing from the iran nuclear deal. there are suggestions that he may phase in sanctions against tehran. let's speak to sir richard dalton —— former british ambassador to iran, who joins us via webcam.
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good to have you with a sir richard. donald trump as we know previously has made announcements sometimes that has not followed through on them, at least not wholeheartedly. what is your best guess on what the announcement will be at 7pm our time tonight? we don't know. it looks as though he is going to withdraw the united states from the agreement. and seek to have the nuclear sanctions that were withdrawn under that agreement reimposed and it is possible he will postpone a matter one more time in order to give his north korea diplomacy the best chance. 0r indeed decide that he will work with the europeans in finding some approaches to solving some of the problem is that he says
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he has with the agreement. and use that as a ladder to climb down and give this essential arms proliferation agreements are further lease of life. but we just cannot predict what he is going to do. looking at the representations that have been made by various european nations, european leaders, how much do you think they will have been able to persuade donald trump? well, there have been one or two optimistic remarks by british spokesmen. for example, the british ambassador in washington said he thought the issues could be resolved, and borisjohnson said that as well when he was in washington recently yet no such optimism has emerged from other european capitals and president trump is not driven by rational considerations about american
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interests all the security of the middle east. he is driven, it would appear, by his passion to undo what was agreed by president 0bama and to escalate tensions in the region with iran. so it's impossible to say how much influence the european representations have had, although i was glad to see a determined statement by the french and the germans which i think the british would agree with, that even if the united states withdraws, the european countries will work to stay within the agreement and to keep it alive. that brings me to my next question if i may interrupt. if the us does pull out entirely, but the other signatories declared that they wa nt to other signatories declared that they want to stay firm, does the deal actually survive? well the iranians
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have a strong point when they say they haven't had the full benefits that they were entitled to under the deal, and if america reintroduces sanctions it will be even harder for businesses and banks to cooperate with iran. so there will be strong pressures in iran to retaliate and to ta ke pressures in iran to retaliate and to take steps which question iran is adherence to the agreement. but we will have to hope that wiser heads prevail in tehran and that the europeans will work with iran to preserve the agreement which is after a ll preserve the agreement which is after all confirmed by the international atomic energy agency numerous times, iran is abiding by currently. briefly what is the alternative to the current deal? there's no alternative, plan b, as mrjohnson said, has not either been
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presented all worked out, certainly the israelis have no plan b, the deal will not be ricocheted to it — renegotiated, some supplements might be renegotiated in time but in present we don't know if the iranians would be ready to move towards the europeans on such proposals particularly as the europeans themselves are struggling to provide decent integration for iran in the internationalfinancial system to facilitate european trade and investment with iran as promised in the deal. so we are moving into a very uncertain period both hope and peace and security, for original relations and for british businesses. 0k, sir richard dalton, former ambassador to iran, thank you very much. a man who pressured his 1a—year—old son to take the blame
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for a murder he committed has been jailed for at least 26 years. 50—year—old tree surgeon matthew moseley shot dead lee holt before handing the firearm to his son thomas last october. he told him to tell police he was the one who pulled the trigger outside their home in lancashire. matthew moseley was found guilty of murder at preston crown court last week. a 2a—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder — following an armed siege in oxford. police, who'd exchanged gunfire with an armed man at a property in the city centre, say the incident ended peacefully. one person received treatment for non—life—threatening injuries. police say a 13—year—old—boy shot in north london over the weekend was an innocent bystander. 0fficers investigating the incident say the teenager was hit by shotgun pellets as he walked with his parents on wealdstone high street on sunday. he was one of five people shot in the capital within 2a hours. it's a country which boasts some of the most
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beautiful animals in africa, but zimba bwe's reputation as a wildlife destination has faced challenges in recent years. the killing of cecil the lion in 2015 exposed a conservation sector plagued by allegations of corruption and under—funding. now a group of women is hoping to change all that by taking on the protection of a former trophy hunting reserve. shingai nyoka reports. for decades, this was a man's job. physically gruelling foot patrols tracking groups of poachers armed and ready to kill. it's dangerous work. so when this anti—poaching unit was set up nine months ago, many were sceptical. theyjust think that we cannot do it. we cannot do it at all. they just saw us as failures. but they are wrong. they are totally wrong. this area was once used for trophy hunting. bad management and poaching saw game numbers plummet.
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the women are working to revive it, but protecting the 100 square miles reserve is a big ask. strike! the privately funded project is managed by a special forces soldier. he made the decision not to treat the women any differently. these women, most of them just wouldn't break. we ended up with a position there where we had to effectively tell women that they had to leave because none of them would pull off voluntarily. more aggression this time. long—term solutions involve winning the hearts and minds of the community, and the most effective way to do that through the women. singing. damien recruited community women who had fallen on hard times. my former husband used to explain to me that he didn't ever want me to be employed somewhere or to do
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something. i'm not afraid. i have freedom. singing. are you scared? laughter. how many arrests have we done now, we've done many many arrests. more than 30. tonight their training is being tested, following a tip—off, they are sweeping a village in door—to—door raids. these women are at the forefront of policing their own communities and they have just arrested a fourth suspect in what they believe to be a commercial poaching syndicate. a major coup, they've netted a wanted ivory poacher. he is laterjailed for nine years for poisoning elephants with cyanide. the unit's success hasn't gone unnoticed. so inspired by these women, the president's daughter
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signed up to be a volunteer ranger. it's going to play a huge role, our statement that zimbabwe is open for business, ifeel this is going to be key to seeing tourism being reignited in our nation. in a country where wildlife conservation receives little to no state financial assistance, there is a lot to be done. but after two exhausting weeks in the bush, the rangers head home. the project plans to roll out more women only reserves around the country. it has become a powerful idea, putting women in charge of zimba bwe's wildlife. to reform a sector blighted by scandal and corruption. perhaps just the fresh start that the country needs. shingai nyoka, bbc news, zimbabwe. fantastic team. in a moment a summary of the business news
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this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: president trump will announce later whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal. bridging the generational divide — a call for all 25—year—olds to be given ten thousand pounds each — and for working pensioners to pay more towards the nhs. rail companies begin a public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use. in the business news... the owner of clydesdale bank and yorkshire bank has made a takeover approach for virgin money as it tries to create a more substantial challenger bank to take on the big four lenders. the combined bank would have six million customers. virgin money says it's reviewing the proposal. the drugmaker shire has agreed to a £a6 billion takeover by the japanese pharmaceutical firm, takeda.
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it ends a long takeover battle with takeda making five separate offers since march and it's the biggest overseas takeover by a japanese firm in history. average house prices fell by more than 3% in april, the biggest monthly drop in nearly eight years. a report by halifax bank says activity in the property market has been soft all year but it expects the strong labour market will keep prices growing throughout 2018. welcome to business news this morning. a lot of news coming up. but first, should we be taxing the old to subsidise the young? that's the radical proposal made by policymakers at the resolution foundation who say that the contract between young and old people has broken down. their suggestion to fix it is higher taxes for older people and a £10,000 lump sum for millenials. we've been speaking to one family from cannock, staffordshire. i grew up in a council house in scotland and as i say, very different, but i think
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when i was first married, it was a struggle to get onto the housing market, and bring up the children, whereas now, i think, my daughter, it was a little bit easier, going to university. for my daughter's perspective, it definitely was a bit easier. i guess, you know, when i left university, financially to get a house it was a lot easier, you know, and we rented for a while, get married, two incomes coming in, and we have talked about it, the only way dan could move out is if they're's two of them is if there's two of them and they move out and they rent, because there is such a big deposit needed nowadays, and houses are so expensive, so, i think he is here for a while. i'm jealous to be honest, i'd love to get my own place that you won't until your late 205, it's just the
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way it is at the moment. voices from the different generations. joining us now is laura gardner, principle researcher at the resolution foundation and author of the report. thank you forjoining us. . first let's talk about the housing issue and the suggestion of giving 25—year—olds £10,000. that might buy you a flat in some areas but in the south, in london it doesn't go far, and also a boost to the housing market, is it a bit short—sighted?” think the two—year study that concludes today has set at the deep scale of the problem facing younger generations in owning homes, and in the amount of income they spent on housing battles in the labour market, improving their skills and saving for a pension not beset by risk. so one of the many proposals we have put out today for a restricted use asset endowment for
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all 25—year—olds and £10,000 is to address the fact that young people are assets of the same rate as their predecessors and they are facing more risks. housing is wendy's because we are finding the money from other schemes that currently inflate prices in the housing market and from inheritance is used to buy houses, i don't think there is too great a risk other than pounds of demand. doesn't make a ma, housing market, given that we're talking about flat in london, you'd need a deposit of at least 50% on a property worth £5,000. it's a really big dent, scotland and is a big challenge, we recognise that, and some of our proposals about how we can change stamp duty and property taxation have that in mind that the citizens inheritance, this grant, it can citizens inheritance, this grant, it ca n cover citizens inheritance, this grant, it can cover the skills for a masters, if invested into a pension it will
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result in £a5,000 when young people retire, it can be used to pay student debt, it is a big bold a nswer to student debt, it is a big bold answer to the range of challenges young people face, the rest of their living standards, and it's how we face up to the generational contract. i just face up to the generational contract. ijust want face up to the generational contract. i just want to move face up to the generational contract. ijust want to move on a bit. we don't have much time! it's the idea of coming into pension age, some people on social media feel aggrieved at having to be taxed higher when they have supported children all their life. does this feel fair? children all their life. does this feelfair? we children all their life. does this feel fair? we flipped the amount of money that the nhs and the care system money that the nhs and the care syste m o nly money that the nhs and the care system only does the baby boom generation retires. it's staggering, an extra £2a billion by the end of the next decade. if we just go down the next decade. if we just go down the normal route of more taxes on the normal route of more taxes on the working age population that will bear heavily on the people who had the toughest time in the financial crisis. and it's not fair to borrow that many other and we definitely don't want to cut those services for
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older people. so it has to be addressed case—by—case case rather than one flat tax? absolutely. we are looking at ways to raise moderate amounts of new revenue in a fair way, way that improves the efficiency of the tax system are the richest, four fifths of the revenues we propose comes from the richest, it's not about taxing all pensioners, we recognise that pensioners, we recognise that pensioner poverty is an issue but we need to find sources of funding and not just bear down upon need to find sources of funding and notjust bear down upon the young. thank you, laura. let's look at the other business news making the headlines today. shares in airfrance klm have stabilised after a turbulent day of trading. 1a% was wiped off the airline's value yesterday after a warning by the french economy minister that the future of the company was in doubt if it can't reach a pay deal with its staff. workers walked off the job for the 1ath separate day of strike action yesterday as they seek
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a 5% pay rise. the tesla founder elon musk has spent more than seven million pounds of his own money buying shares in the electric carmaker. tesla reported record losses last week. in an angry outburst, musk warned speculators there would be "carnage" for anyone betting on its shares losing value. that is known as shorting in the investment world. you can't quite see what's in here but it is wet wipes. could wet wipes get caught up in the clampdown on plastic waste? you might not have realised they contain non—biodegradable plastic and are responsible for so—called fatbergs of congealed waste building up in our sewers. the government has included wet wipes in its plan to eliminate plastic waste so manufacturers will need to develop plastic free versions or wet wipes will be wiped out! a quick look at the markets, one japanese pharmaceutical manufacturer has struck a deal which has been in
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the pipeline for some time now, investors quite like it, that's about 3.9%, and to look at brent crude, there are awaiting an announcement from president trump later today about the nuclear deal with iran, if people is that of course that will have ramifications on the price. that said the business. back to you, annita. thank you. some breaking news, heidi alexander, labour mp for lewisham east, is going to step down to become sadiq khan's deputy mayor for transport. the mayor has confirmed this news in the last few moments. his current deputy is retiring after 18 years and he says he is delighted that heidi alexander has agreed to fill the position. there will be a by—election in lewisham east. heidi alexander has a majority of over 21,000 there and she willjoin the
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mayor of london, sadiq khan, as deputy mayor for transport. celebrities have gathered at one of new york's most dazzling events: the met ball. the event raises funds for the metropolitan museum of art's costume institute and attracts fashion designers and stars from around the world. this year's theme of "heavenly bodies: fashion and the catholic imagination" inspired some incredible outfits, as nada tawfik reports. the grand staircase of the met gala was full of divine inspiration, angelic halos, bejewelled crosses, and flowing robes ruled the red carpet. the theme of this year's costume ball was heavenly bodies and the catholic imagination. so the who's who of fashion, hollywood, sports and music dressed in their sunday's best. i thought this theme was actually really playful and extremely meaningful and fun, and there's a lot you could do with such an incredible theme, creatively.
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rihanna was a show stopper in this jewel encrusted pope outfit. the singer was a co—host of the evening along with donatella versace, and amal clooney, who wore this gown inspired by stained—glass. look after look dazzled the fashion's biggest night. i think one of the most amazing things is to see people rarely focu5 on fashion. i know the oscars, golden globes, it is about that industry, and people love to dress, but this is about our industry. and its is about de5igner5 being fearle55 and being able to create in a way that they normally might not be able to create. it is always such a magical night. you feel like cinderella coming up these stairs, and you know, getting dressed up and having such a fantasy. it may seem controversial to pair the superficial with the sacred. but the vatican has actually blessed this event. they have loaned dozens of rare
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items including one tiara with 18,000 diamonds in it to be displayed. many of the items have never been seen outside the vatican before. this year involved negotiations with the vatican for a very long time. and it's a wonderful thing to bring all this extraordinary clothing and objects from the vatican. if some young person comes to see the fashion that sees the exhibition as well that is a great achievement. the crossover is what i love about it. the invitation — only event is always full of surprises. and the designs never disappoint. bbc news, new york. not your everyday look but rather fabulous! now time for the weather with simon king. i think you've got an image of a rather nice beach. i have annita, the beach was
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probably not as packed as it was yesterday, fabulous bank holiday weekend, but temperatures are likely to reach the high or mid—20s, it's nice and sunny at the moment, this picture was taken by a weather watcher in north berwick. the beach and not as packed as yesterday, a lot of sunshine across england and wales at the moment but if you are in the north and the west, we've already got a change, cool and fresh and conditions. we should hold onto the heat but look at this picture of blues taking over as we return to the atlantic flow which brings temperatures down. for the rest of this afternoon in the rain should move into scotland, north—west england and north wales, jebb writing in northern ireland this afternoon sunshine, some showers across england, another hot day, further west temperatures lower than
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yesterday, between 15 and 2021 degrees. through this evening and tonight that every of rain will continue to spread north and east and eventually to clear away, that weather front is what is bringing in the fatah conditions, so we look to the fatah conditions, so we look to the atlantic and we've got this area of low pressure moving in for wednesday that wednesday should be fairly dry and bright for a start, although the cloud should thicken from the west with rain moving from northern ireland and scotland, western fringes of england and wales at the end of wednesday. temperatures down again, 12 or 13 degrees in scotland and northern ireland, 19 and 21 celsius dented east of england, the rain associated with a weather front will move east and then we've got a rich of high—pressure setting info thursday. so thursday should be mostly dry, again, sunny spells and some showers towards northern england and across scotland, this could be a bit heavy,
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thursday again as temperatures into the low to mid, perhaps higher teens, 17 celsius in london, 13 or 14 teens, 17 celsius in london, 13 or 1a celsius elsewhere. friday, gain a dry and bright start and like a repeat performance much of this week cloud thickening from the west, rain towards western areas throughout the day, the further east, it will stay dry and bright, those temperatures from the midst of the high teens. that's it from me. bye bye. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. president trump will announce later whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal. bridging the generational divide — a call for all 25—year—olds to be given £10 thousand each — and for working pensioners to pay
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more towards the nhs. rail companies begin a public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use. are you ready to resign? borisjohnson describes one of downing street's plans for customs controls after brexit as "crazy". also coming up, america's first lady in another plagiarism row. melania launches an online safety campaign — with a booklet bearing a striking resemblance to one from the 0bama administration. and divine inspiration at this year's met gala — the stars grace new york's biggest social event of the year with outfits based on religion, and the pope. good afternoon.
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it's tuesday 8th may. welcome to bbc newsroom live. president trump has announced on twitter that he'll reveal later today whether the united states is to abandon the iran nuclear deal. there's speculation he may say the us will only partially pull out of the accord. the deal was signed by iran and the us, the uk, russia, france, china, germany and the eu in 2015. an agreement was reached to ensure iran's nuclear program would be "exclusively peaceful". but opponents of the deal — such as israel — have accused the iranian regime of lying about their nuclear capabilities. president trump has called the deal "insane" and will announce later today
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whether he wants the us to pull out. iran says it wants to maintain constructive relations with the world. the foreign secretary borisjohnson went to washington at the weekend, where he argued for president trump to keep the status quo. we think that what you can do is be tougher on iran, address the concerns of the president, and not throw the baby out with the bath water. 0ur correspondent paul adams explains how the iran nuclear deal reduced tensions between the islamic republic and the west. is the nuclear deal about to be called off? it came after years of tension over iran's alleged efforts to build a bomb. iran had always said its programme was peaceful, but no one believed this, and for almost ten years, the un imposed sanctions. the deal brought together the five permanent numbers of the un security council and the eu.
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it was called the joint comprehensive plan of action. the jcpoa. so, what exactly was in it? iran agreed to do away with large part of its nuclear programme, and allow international inspectors to monitor the rest. this involved giving up large stockpiles of enriched uranium, and thousands of centrifuges. as a result, experts believed it would take iran much longer to make a bomb in the future. up from 2—3 months to around a year, giving the international community much more time to respond to a crisis. in return, the international community agreed to lift sanctions. iran could recover billions of pounds of frozen assets. it could sell more oil on the international market, and trade like a normal country. iran is sticking to its side of the bargain, but the deal has always had its critics. israel and saudi arabia say that it isn't tough enough. israel's prime minister in particular says that iran should not be trusted. iran lied.
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donald trump says it's the worst deal in the world. the iran deal was one of the worst and most one—sided transaction i have ever seen drawn by anybody ever, ever. he has been threatening to walk away, unless what he sees as the deal‘s flaws can be fixed. so, what are these perceived flaws, and can they be fixed? well, for one thing, many of the deal‘s key provisions expire after ten, 15 or even 25 years. for some, this is a problem. nor does the deal address iran's ballistic missile programme. or what many regard as its increasingly aggressive behaviour around the middle east, in places like syria and yemen. it's more and more clear that the us administration is likely to withdraw sanctions against iran. what it means in practice, this deal remains to be seen, we do not know whether the action
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of the europeans will be, we don't know what the actions of russia and china will be, and most importantly, we don't know what the actions of iran will be. no one quite knows what mr trump has in mind, but if he does make good on his threat, the deal‘s other backers have a problem. do they try and keep it alive by themselves, or pressure iran into accepting new conditions. if that happens, iran, too, could walk away. paul adams, bbc news. you can watch president trump announce his decision on whether to withdraw from the iran nuclear deal later this evening. beyond 100 days with christian fraser and katty kay will be covering the live event at seven o'clock here on bbc news. a group looking at the economic differences between old and young people has recommended that 25—year—olds should receive a £10 thousand payment,
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and working pensioners should contribute more to the nhs. the resolution foundation's intergenerational commission claims radical reforms are needed to stop under—30s having a poorer life than their parents. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity reports. a family gathering in cannock, staffordshire, on the left, stephanie garden was born into the post—war baby—boom generation that enjoyed higher incomes and more wealth than their parents. her daughter karen, who is a8 hoped for the same but her grandson dan, born in the 1990s has been dealt afarweaker hand. dan's age—group earn no more than the same age group 15 years ago. they are half as likely to own a home at 30 and four times as likely to rent privately. loved the place, but the reality is,
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you're not going to be able to. it is just the way it is moment. while many pensioners are poor, on average, those drawing the state pension have higher incomes than they have ever had. after housing costs, they are higher than for people of working age. yet, if they work, pensioners pay no national insurance. there are inevitable pressures for public spending to go up on healthcare and social care. and it is reasonable to expect the baby boomers, who have a very substantial part of the nation's wealth, to make that contribution towards meeting those costs, especially as it will be for services from which they themselves directly benefit. among the commission's recommendations are 2.3 billion more for the nhs, paid for by national insurance on pensioners' earnings and all 25—year—olds will get a £10,000 citizens inheritance which could be paid for by scrapping inheritance tax and instead taxing large cash gifts. i don't think the young ones today have got it as easy as what some people think. i think it's quite difficult for them.
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politicians don't like annoying the grey vote but the intergenerational commission says that to close the financial generation gap, something has to be done. andy verity, bbc news. and i'll be speaking to the director of the resolution foundation, torsten bell just after 11.30am. we are hearing that the chinese president has met kimjong—un in a tiny city. the meeting taking place in the two days. part of a build—up, perhaps, to try and work on a deal with north korea to get rid of its nuclear programme in advance of any summit that might happen between the us and north korea, as well. us first lady melania trump has launched a campaign to teach children the importance of social, emotional and physical health.
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the first lady announced her "be best" initiative in the rose garden at the white house as her husband looked on. she said the older generation had a responsibility to help children to use social media in positive ways. as we all know, social media can be both positively and negatively affect our children for the positive and negative ways. when children learn positive online babies early on, social media can be used in productive ways to effect positive change. i do believe that children should be both seen and heard, did is our responsibility as adults to educate and remind them that when they are using their voices, verbally or online, they must choose their words wisely and speak with respect and compassion. we can speak now to
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john schiumo, who's a correspondent for the cbs television network in new york. first of all, there is a plagiarism accusation that accompanies this campaign? the effort is noble, prevent online bullying, stop the abuse of opioids, but their claims of pagers and, perhaps unfair. i will let viewers decide. the website says, click here to read a booklet by first lady alagna charm —— melania trump. that speech included serval quotes or theme is taken from michelle 0bama. she said as part of the speech in the rose garden, they must choose their words wisely and speak with respect and
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compassion. this was in the context of adult educating and reminding children that they must use their voices carefully, whether verbally or online. way few people rolling their eyes at that, given the victory all —— vitriol which her husband donald trump users on twitter? rolling their eyes is a kind way of saying what i saw on social media in response. the backdrop is easy months ago, there has been a long wait to learn the details of her platform, and specific to bullying online, several social media users were re—tweeting all of the tweets from the resident where it was certainly questionable online behaviour. —— the president. so, the mission is not lost on surgical americans, for sure. melania trump has not seemed especially comfortable in her role
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as first lady up until now. do people feel that sunning had changed and that she was more at ease?” have not seen that preys necessarily. i think a lot of people here in the state of routine for her to ta ke here in the state of routine for her to take a more active stance in this white house in some cases, and maybe combat some of the things that are coming from her husband, but this is a first lady who is, for her matt reeves —— for her marriage, at least, lived in the shadow of the president, and she has got to walk a delicate balance to see how vocal she can get. i have not seen necessarily strong praise or criticism. yesterday, most people are commenting on the slogan, the best, some people are describing it as grammatically challenged. but in theory, a figure americans are rooting for the pillars of this platform to come together. thank you very much. more now on news that president trump will announce later
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whether the united states is withdrawing from the iran nuclear deal. there are suggestions that he may phase in sanctions against tehran. 0ur correspondent barbara plett usher is in washington. barbara, hello to you, any advance, hints and suggestions coming out of the white house as to what direction the white house as to what direction the president will go in? not in the usual way, in the sense that we normally get a background briefing to tell us what the thinking is at how they expect things to develop. we have not had anything in that formal way, so that suggests that they are not entirely sure of the details themselves, because of mr trump does begin to reimpose sanctions, which is the expectation, it is an charted territory, there is no set formula, i have somebody brea ks no set formula, i have somebody breaks their commitments at the iran nuclear deal, but one of the ways that he could reimpose sanctions
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would be in phases. he would start with sanctions that deal with the sale of oil, and how companies can buy oilfrom sale of oil, and how companies can buy oil from iran, sale of oil, and how companies can buy oilfrom iran, because sale of oil, and how companies can buy oil from iran, because these are the sanctions that are said to be renewed this week, and how he goes about doing that, there is some middle ground, there, he could give some wiggle room to allies, to buy oilfor a period of time, that would stretch over munster in which negotiations would take place. and during that —— of months during which negotiations would take place. and then people will be watching how the iranians respond, were they kick it inspection is —— inspectors, and resume, could they be pressured into taking a tougher line on iran. that is one way that he could approach it, but we don't know exactly how he will do it, and also, even when he announces what he is planning to do, that is not clear,
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how it will play out, and one european diplomat said, we cannot say now what the consequences would be, because they're all sorts of factors involved, when you start to unravel a corrugated deal like this. just seeing a quote on the iranians state news agency quoting... the quote is that the armed forces are delivering their best services, and that's no threat to fight since —— frightens in rann. to what degree, if anything, has he been persuaded by the concerns of other signatories to this deal, that in their fever, there is no alternative, and if the us pulls away, the deal itself might be in grave danger?” us pulls away, the deal itself might be in grave danger? i think if he makes the announcement as the
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expect, then he has not been persuaded by this argument. you see are diplomat saying, you have some legitimate concerns about the deal, for example, the fact that the limit expired over time, the deal does not address a rann's ballistic missile programme which can be seen as a —— iran's ballistic missile programme which can be seen as a threat, but that would be a argument for not reimposing factions, because... so, ithink so, i think if the announcement is what we expect, then it would show that he has not taken this argument
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on board. just finally, how much do you think president trump is driven by his desire to an pic work that president 0bama did?” by his desire to an pic work that president 0bama did? i think we can see in this decision, if it goes as we expect, two elements of most of his foreign policy decisions, one is that he likes to be the an 0bama, and an pic what 0bama has done, and the other is that he likes to meet promises that he majoring his campaign, and one of his consistent policies would be either to rip up the iran nuclear deal, or to fix it. thank you very much. the time is now 70 minutes past 12. —— 17 minutes past 12. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: president trump will announce later whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal. bridging the generational divide — a call for all 25 year olds to be given £10,000 each —
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and for working pensioners to pay more towards the nhs. rail companies begin a public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use. now the sport with 0lly foster. thank you, we start with world champion mark williams, who said he thought his career had ended five years ago and he watched last year's championship drunk in his caravan, before he claimed his third title at the crucible last night. he beatjohn higgins 18—16 in a thrilling final to become the oldest world snooker champion for a0 years. his last title was in 2003. the welshman failed to even qualify for the championship last year but this season he has won the northern ireland open
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and the german masters. to think i'm going to have a season like this next season is probably a bit silly of me to think i will carry on this form, and the run. but you know, if i turn up next season and i play like an absolute fish, then i can't grumble. this season has just made up for the last 15 years of playing absolute garbage! job and —— john job and ——john higgins job and —— john higgins was the runner—up last year. i had an unbelievable amount of respect forjimmy white as a player but for him to come back six times and losing 5ix final5, and still being a class act on and off the table, that's me i've lost in two finals and it's heartbreaking but for him to do that, i can only imagine what he went through, coming back every year, going again, again, and again. it's tough, it's tough. as expected, the arsenal captain,
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laurent koscielny is out of the world cup this summer. you will be at the six months after surgery or ona at the six months after surgery or on a ruptured achilles tendon. the manager says the defender is devastated and picked up the injury during last thursday's europa defeat against athletic admitted —— atletico madrid. three days after knocking out david haye to win the 30th fight of his career, heavyweight tony bellew says he is torn over whether to walk away from the sport. he says his wife wants him to retire, but he feels in the best form of his life and is tempted by talk of a fight against former heavyweight world champion tyson fury, who has of course announced his comeback to the ring. everyone wants to see me face guys i can't beat and when you tell me i can't beat them its music to my ears, i want to do it even more. it is not a punch—up, the only thing he has over me is size, height and weight. i have speed, power and a better boxing brain than him. that is all these boards are now. we
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will have more free in the next hour. # more for you in the next hour. borisjohnson has described one of the government's post—brexit customs proposals as "crazy". in an interview with the daily mail, the foreign secretary said one of the ideas downing street is considering for a customs deal with the eu would stop britain taking back control of trade. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in downing street. this very public criticism by boris johnson, what does that do to the effo rts johnson, what does that do to the efforts to formulate a public policy? i think it makes the prospect of any compromise amongst senior ministers increasingly remote. it also significantly raises the stakes for mrs may, because we already know that leading brexiteers have signalled that they will not accept this idea of a customs partnership, thought to be favoured by mrs may, under which the uk would
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collect tariffs en route to the european union. 0vernight, boris johnson has publicly trashed that idea. let mejust johnson has publicly trashed that idea. let me just give you some of the work that he used in an interview in the daily mail. he said that the idea was totally and tried, and it would make it very difficult to do free trade deals, free trade deals which brexiteers believed would be a key advantage of leaving the customs union. he then goes on to say, described this partnership as, "a crazy system, whereby you end up as, "a crazy system, whereby you end up collecting tariffs on behalf of the eu and the uk's border.". why this is such a escalation of the sta kes this is such a escalation of the stakes is because it is very hard to see how, if this were to become government policy, mrjohnson could back it, and not surprisingly, that has raised question marks about
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whether mrjohnson is preparing to quit over the issue. he was asked that as he left cabinet this morning, i did not answer. that as he left cabinet this morning, i did notanswer. he that as he left cabinet this morning, i did not answer. he was also asked earlier, as he arrived. just have a listen. morning sir. if the brexit plan is that crazy, are you ready to resign? morning sir. 0ne one thing that seems absolutely clear is that the brexiteers and borisjohnson seem determined to make a stand on this issue. for them, it is a fundamental issue about whether we leave leave all remain. the former tory leader, iain duncan smith, prominent brexiteer this morning saying that he believed it was time that mrs may would have to drop this proposal.” it was time that mrs may would have to drop this proposal. i do not see the point in carrying on with this proce55. because it's clear and obvious to anybody who knows anything about export, and about doing deal5 on exports, that this doesn't work.
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and therefore the best thing to do is to do what they call the maximum facilitation. which is basically what we have at the moment for our export5, but enhanced dramatically using technology and new processes. now that will take some development, yes, but its base is what we do at the moment, not inventing some completely new 5y5tem. and we need to be able to say that is the best position to be in, because it's likely that we will be ready to do that. and even if it's not completely developed, you'll still be able to import— export good5 because the system already exists. that other system does not. so, what happens next. i think the view of team makers irrespective of whatever boris johnson might view of team makers irrespective of whatever borisjohnson might be choosing to do, the plan of team may is to delay any immediate decision, to keep making the arguments, and get the proposals were revised in the hope that you can convince one
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or two of those ministers sitting on the crucial brexit subcommittee to support her, so that she can get this idea through. norman, thank you very much. norman smith in downing street. just a reminder of the news coming to us that the chinese premier has had a meeting with the north korean leader, king. —— kimjong—un. news urging of the conversations between the two men, and we are also hearing out that president trump is saying that will speak to president of china a little later. 0ne that will speak to president of china a little later. one gets the sense that a conversation is going on, to try and build up to a potential us, north korean summit, with of course the aim of denuclearise think it is north korea, we had to get some images of the meeting —— hope to get some
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images of the meeting that is taking place between the chinese president and kimjong—un, and i did then we have this picture is quite yet, but we will bring them only get them. —— when we get them. rail companies are proposing a shake—up of the current fares system to make it simplerfor consumers. the rail delivery group — which represents the industry — says there are around 55 million ticket prices in the current system. it admits customers are not always offered the cheapest tickets available because of its complexity. earlier robert nisbet from the rail delivery group explained why the system needs to be overhauled. regulations were set in stone back in the 1990s, over 20 years ago when things were very very different. we didn't really have smartphones. there were more pagers than there were smartphones. and now of course our lifestyles are far more flexible. many of us work from home more, or we are self—employed. and so we want it to be simpler and easierfor customers when they go to, say, a ticket machine like here at liverpool street, or they pay for a ticket on their phone
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that they are going to get the cheapest fare for the journey that they are about to make. and we think that is right to establish trust with customers that they trust the system and they know they are going to get the cheapest fare. following the announcement this morning, passengers have said how they think the system could be improved. a kind of website where you can find the most cheapest one. will simplify. at the moment there are too many ticket5 going and it's very difficult for the layman like me. i don't use the train all the time but when i do i'm very confused as to what to pick so if it's simplified maybe journey byjourney and it's made easier tojust pick where you are going. by the website. it is time to take a look at the
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weather for the cast and darren that has the latest for us. some heat, but certainly not everywhere. things are starting to change, and we are coming in from the west and we can see that area of cloud. and some rain, too. very little across other parts of the uk, already. we have got to be heated in eastern england, where temperatures of 2627 degrees, today. again, i rain purchased the —— pushes eastwards, one or two sharp showers in eastern england. cooler and fresher and clear air is following an earlier on tonight. it will be a bit chilly. tomorrow, it sta rts will be a bit chilly. tomorrow, it starts sunny, and it will not feel quite as warm, mind you. also got
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this band of thicker, wet weather. ching in scotland over the irish sea and into western parts of england and into western parts of england and wales. ahead of it, —— pushing into scotland over the irish sea. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines. north korean leader kimjong—un has made a second visit to china for talks with president xi jinping. president trump is to announce whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal later today. apologies, our pictures are somewhat muddled. rail companies begin public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use. and the foreign secretary describes one of downing street's plans for customs controls after brexit as ‘crazy‘. in a moment... the spider thatjumps on demand.
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scientists plan to study how kim, the arachnid, propels itself up to six times its body length. wet wipes — of the kind often used for cleaning the next couple of decades?- the government now has as part of its commitment to reduce plastic waste. let's speak to natalie fee, founder of the group city to sea, which campaigns against marine pollution. she's in bristol. natalie, thank you forjoining us. wet wipes containing plastic, perhaps not many people were aware of that? exactly, for some people it's a shock to find things they have been flashing away do contain plastics because not all the packets
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of wipes, some of them just say the 100% water, so people perhaps did not think what is the actual material made of, what is this substance. because it isn't on the packs. looking at one statistic around wet wipes, i am seeing that 90% of blocked uk's sewage pipes are caused by wet wipes which is quite the figure. what do you think we can do, what is it that we can do to speed up and move away from plastics and wet wipes to a more environmentally friendly alternative? i think the government exploring the ban is great news and very welcome. it is hugely controversial because i know as a pa rent controversial because i know as a parent myself how invaluable wet wipes are that there are alternatives. you can carry reusable washable wipes. it's quite a leap for people to think about doing that
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and it is possible and thousands of people do it already. so i think thatis people do it already. so i think that is key, to explore the options. we've got a lot of options on the table that we can look at, changing the labelling like we have with cigarettes with we have disgusting images and packs, if we had images of animals dying of plastic pollution and the packages of baby wipes that would make people think twice about flushing them away. wipes that would make people think twice about flushing them awaym it's down to public pressure of plastic straws, ann coffey caps, is this the next big campaign, getting the public on board to say that they wa nt the public on board to say that they want manufacturers to produce an alternative? yes. i think the possible problem with that is the alternatives themselves, whether they could be flushed, whether that
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material would be switching, we don't know what impact that would have on the marine environment where it isn't breaking up. we don't want tojump out of it isn't breaking up. we don't want to jump out of the frying pan into the fire so the message one company has developed a white witches flushable and would meet the waters industry guidelines so i think what we will see this in new form of wipes. i think we will see the water industry publishing new specifications which would include wipes which are ok to be flushed. they might not be called wipes. they might be called moist toilet tissue.
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is this campaign more of a challenge because other people use them to ta ke because other people use them to take of make up all parents using them to clean their babies, they wa nt them to clean their babies, they want that convenience. they don't wa nt want that convenience. they don't want necessarily to have to start washing wipes which they can then reuse. exactly, when you're talking about my key issues, the thing with make up wipes, you canjust about my key issues, the thing with make up wipes, you can just put them in the bin, i think with some brands you will be able to compost them so that will be an exciting way to change people's behaviour is around not flushing them, but when people are wiping babies bottoms you can just put a wet wipe inside an abbey and people are flushing nappies. 0ccasionally people do, but you can't just 0ccasionally people do, but you can'tjust do the wipe inside the nappies so there is a big education piece around what you can put down the toilet. it isjust making sure
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it doesn't end up in the sea, primarily. exactly with the amount of plastic they contain at the moment, the violence we see on the banks of the thames as an example, some of them are not biodegradable. good to speak to you, natalie, about the campaign to reduce the number of wet wipes in circulation. the idea ofjumping spiders might make some of us squirm — but scientists at university of manchester have taught one special arachnid to leap on command, to try to learn more about her acrobatic ability. if you're not a fan of our eight—legged friends, you might want to look away now. this is kim, a regaljumping spider — a species famed for its ability to leap. i think she looks rather magnificent, myself. researchers hope that studying kim's movements will give them insight
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into how these creatures are able propel themselves up to six times their body length. earlier our science correspondent helen briggs told me how the researchers were able to train kim. they got a number of spiders just from a pet shop and built in a lab these take—off from a pet shop and built in a lab these ta ke—off and from a pet shop and built in a lab these take—off and landing platforms for them and put them on the take—off platform. for them and put them on the ta ke—off platform. they for them and put them on the take—off platform. they wanted them tojump so take—off platform. they wanted them to jump so that they could film them. not many of the spiders obliged but this little spider they nicknamed kim seemed to lovejumping so they were literally able to build sort of an obstacle course for her just to see how she looked through the air. and that has given them really important information about how these incredible tiny creatures can do that. what was fascinating, reading about the study will, was that kim used differentjumping
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strategies depending on the challenge she faced. yes, these are hunting spiders so imagine being presented with a huge one about to pounce on you. that is what they do. it's quite clever for small spider. she works out she needs to take a big high leap or a really fast loan lea p to big high leap or a really fast loan leap to snare her prey, it would be all about precision and is about kinetics and energy so that you can co nse rve kinetics and energy so that you can conserve energy by doing low energy jumps when she really needs to pounce fast then she would this low trajectory. ultimately what is the purpose of studying this? we are looking to develop a new generation of robot ‘s engineers are looking at nature, some of these scientists are aeronautical engineers and built aeroplanes, they started studying birds but they wanted tinyjumping robots that could perhaps be used in pest control, so they are looking at
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things like grasshoppers, fees and nojumping things like grasshoppers, fees and no jumping spiders which seemed to have the most incredible jumps of all small creatures like that. helen briggs. chinese president xijinping and kimjong un have met in northeast china, in an unannounced visit by the north korean leader ahead of an expected summit with us president donald trump. it's kim's second visit to china since march. we are also hearing that donald trump says that he will be talking to the chinese premier a little later. i think we can show you those images now. these are images from one meeting between the president of china and the north korean leader, going on yesterday and today as well, and perhaps part of the choreography, shall we say, of a
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planned or a proposed summit it in the united states and north korea, with an attempt to denuclearise north korea. let's took to our correspondence. laura bicker is in seoul. is this part of the choreography ahead of a potential us— north korea summit? exactly. if you look at kim jong—un he hasn't left his country for yea rs jong—un he hasn't left his country for years as leader. and here we are, two months in a row, firstly he has that summit with president moon just over ten days ago, before that, he met with the president of china in beijing. firstly he didn't take the train, he took flight. which could be in preparation for any flight could be in preparation for any flight he may have to take for a summit with president trump. and
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secondly, who he is meeting with, he's meeting with north korea's key ally, china, that is president xi. let's look at how close this relationship is. they have been at oddsin relationship is. they have been at odds in the last few months. the chinese envoy tried to visit pyongyang in late autumn last year and was turned away. there was a thought at the time that pyongyang was angry at china for taking part in the sanctions. china has been taking part in these united nations sanctions which is an usual for china. however now we see them together again and we see kim jong—un looking to president xi, shoring up support, in a place of trade in china, it gives a hint as to what he might be looking at especially as kim jong—un has said he wants to pivot towards the economy. he believes his nuclear ambitions have been fulfilled and he
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wa nts to ambitions have been fulfilled and he wants to move towards a different economy, 80% of north korea's trade has come from china, it needs china back on board that china wants to know that north korea is going to be a stable state. it doesn't want american influence, american troops, american influence, american troops, american ships threaten north korea or destabilising that entire region. so they can do for the same thing ahead of every summit and with kim sitting next to president xi that is a strong picture for president trump to ta ke a strong picture for president trump to take in, because it says, hang on a second because when he goes to meet kim jong—un kim jong—un a second because when he goes to meet kimjong—un kimjong—un has strong support in china and in president xi. the images we are seeing now, laura, we'vejust moved offa seeing now, laura, we'vejust moved off a shot which was reminiscent of the summit between kim jong—un and the summit between kim jong—un and the south korean leader recently, and also scenes of kim jong—un and president xi walking through rather
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beautiful landscapes, is rather fascinating to see these images of the north korean leader given that he hasn't left his country until recently. clearly, although there have been these differences between china and north korea which you alluded to, ultimately they need each other and perhaps north korea needs china more than china needs it. when it comes to whether china needs north korea we need to look at what north korea's aims. north korea says it has nuclear weapons, it has worked towards these weapons and it one step onto the global stage, perhaps meet with president trump and find out how on earth they are going to denuclearise or what he will bargain with when it comes to these nuclear weapons. so when it comes to that, north korea and china wa nt comes to that, north korea and china want the same thing, they want
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american influence of this peninsula. considerthis american influence of this peninsula. consider this statement we have been given by chinese media. as long as security threats are eliminated against north korea they do not need nuclear weapons and denuclearisation is would be achievable. thank you, laura bicker. the headlines at almost a quarter to one. president trump will announce later whether the us will withdraw from the iran nuclear deal. bridging the generational divide — a call for all 25 year olds to be given ten thousand pounds each — and for working pensioners to pay more towards the nhs. rail companies begin a public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use. the channel island of guernsey could soon become the first place in the british isles to legalise assisted dying, allowing doctors to help terminally ill patients take their own lives. germany, belgium, switzerland
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and the netherlands all already allow forms of assisted suicide, but it is an issue has sparked fierce debate wherever it is considered, as graham satchell reports. guernsey is a traditional sort of place, conservative with a small c, but the debate here is life and death. i want to have the choice to end my life. that's denied me by the law in guernsey at the moment. should terminally ill islanders be given the legal right to be helped to die? at the packed public meeting, we met marguerite who thought they should. she travelled to dignitas in switzerland with her cousinjohn when he was terminally ill with cancer. he really couldn't countenance that awful loss of dignity, the fear of what was to come and the pain. the reassurance of knowing that he had been able
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to end his life the way that he wanted to was very important. if they do pass the law here, would you use it? i believe it would be my choice. i would certainly want to have the option and i would certainly consider it very strongly. guernsey has a population ofjust over 60,000. it has an independent parliament that can set its own taxes, its own laws. there are of course only two certainties in life, death and taxes. guernsey is already an offshore tax haven. is it really about to become an offshore death haven? not ifjohn guille has any say in it. 0ur choices have consequences for other people... he's chairman of guernsey's hospice. the worry for him, how to protect vulnerable older people from being coerced to end their life. none of us knows what happens behind closed doors and, you know, "it's about time, auntie, that you were moving on from this coil, you know, the quality of life you are experiencing isn't very good at all, my dear."
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i am paraphrasing but one just wonders if that pressure would be there. church groups in guernsey and the doctors' union, the bma, are also against any new legislation. guernsey doesn't currently have a mental capacity act which is an essential piece of legislation to ensure that that person making the decision to die has the ability to do so. back at the public meeting, guernsey's chief minister gavin st pier. the existing dying bill is his idea, written after watching his own father die from heart disease. he told me safeguards can be put in place to prevent abuse and introducing the new law would be a clear sign of social progress. if people come to think of guernsey as being the kind of compassionate, progressive environment that enables individuals
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to determine their own end of life choices then i think it's a very positive thing. if we are seen in the same category as canada, victoria, and washington and california, i think that's positive. the vote is next week. is guernsey about to join parts of north america, europe and australia to become the first place in the british isles to allow assisted dying? graham satchell, bbc news, guernsey. some emerging lines from a spokesman for theresa may, who says that brexit was not mentioned during the cabinet meeting this morning. that is probably a surprise to many of us given those comments by boris johnson calling one of the latest customs proposals "crazy". but the spokesman told reporters that theresa may still has full confidence in her foreign minister, warrenjohnson confidence in her foreign minister, warren johnson —— boris johnson,
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after his comments. after he said the proposal was crazy, brexit not mentioned at the cabinet meeting. also a couple of lines coming in from iran as we wait to find out whether the united states is going to be pulling out of the iran nuclear deal, a prominent iranian cleric is being reported on a couple of news agencies as saying that the supreme leader had predicted that the nuclear deal at tehran signed in 2015 would collapse. he is quoted as saying, we were aware from the beginning that the deal is fragile and will collapse. now we see that the supreme leader had rightly predicted this. this is from one of the leading iranian clerics, also reportedly said it would be wrong to stay in the nuclear deal with the united states decides to withdraw
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from it. and a reminder that we are expecting to hear president trump's decision at 7pm our time and we will bring that to you here on bbc news. dozens of families have been left homeless as lava continues to spew from one of the world's most active volcanoes on hawaii's big island. now local authorities are trying to move thousands of litres of highly flammable liquid out of the path of the molten rock. virginia langeberg reports: a wave of lava crashing forward in slow motion engulfing everything in its path. in this neighbourhood, ever so gradually, homes have been swallowed up. might son asks... 2000 people were evacuated as the slow moving torrents of lava consumed the
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area. at least two dozen families have nothing to return to. residents are being told that any pause in the threat level is just that, a pause. toxic gas remains in the air and geologists predict new ruptures in the ground without any way of knowing how it will happen. there are also concerns for a power plant in the area were highly flammable gases being stored but can't be moved off site for a number of days. according to the company they are assuring the community that there is no danger, even if it does explode that it will not blow any of the houses up. hawaii's kilauea volcano began exploding on thursday and since then tenfold panic fans have spewed from the ground. it is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and has been in constant eruption for 35 years but not like this. friday saw the island rocked
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by its most powerful earthquake in four decades, a magnitude of 6.1. experts say the volatility shows no sign of easing. more earthquakes and eruptions could go on for even months to come. for now there have been no deaths or serious injury. this area carries the highest hazard level for lava flows in hawaii, making homes more affordable. a risk that some had no choice but to take. and sadly it is a gamble that dozens have already lost. celebrities have gathered at one of new york's most dazzling events: the met ball. the event raises funds for the metropolitan museum of art's costume institute and attracts fashion designers and stars from around the world.this year's theme of "heavenly bodies: fashion and the catholic imagination" inspired some incredible outfits, as our reporter nada tawfik reports. the grand staircase of the met gala was full of divine inspiration, angelic halos, bejewelled crosses,
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and flowing robes ruled the red carpet. the theme of this year's costume ball was heavenly bodies and the catholic imagination. so the who's who of fashion, hollywood, sports and music dressed in their sunday's best. i thought this theme was actually really playful and extremely meaningful and fun, and there's a lot you could do with such an incredible theme, creatively. rihanna was a show—stopper in this jewel encrusted pope outfit. the singer was a co—host of the evening along with donatella versace, and amal clooney, who wore this gown inspired by stained—glass. not the easiest thing to manoeuvre. look after look dazzled at fashion's biggest night. i think one of the most amazing things is to see people really focus on fashion.
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i know the oscars, golden globes, it is about that industry, and people love to dress, but this is about our industry. and it's about designers being fearless and being able to create in a way that they normally might not be able to create. it is always such a magical night. you feel like cinderella coming up these stairs, and you know, getting dressed up and having such a fantasy. it may seem controversial to pair the superficial with the sacred. blessed this event. but the vatican has actually blessed this exhibition. they have loaned dozens of rare items including one tiara with 18,000 diamonds in it to be displayed. many of the items have never been seen outside the vatican before. this year involved actual negotiations with the vatican for a very long time. and it's a wonderful thing to bring all this extraordinary clothing and objets from the vatican. if some young person comes to see the fashion but sees the exhibition as well that is a great achievement. so the crossover is
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what i love about it. the invitation—only event is always full of surprises. and the designs never disappoint. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. many of us will have been out in the garden, possibly mowing the lawn over the bank holiday. but probably not like this. it was the start of the 2018 british lawnmower championships in west sussex. these specially adapted machines can reach speeds of 50 miles per hour. they've had their blades removed for safety reasons. the champion will be crowned at the end of the season in october. lovely weather for it. if you suffer from hay fever you may not have wa nted from hay fever you may not have wanted to be in the garden over the weekend, trying to avoid pollen. we have some amazing pictures now of a pollen cloud. these images were taken in chamonix, the french
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weather service has forecast high levels of atmospheric pollen this week. it is quite unusual, isn't it, to see images like this. clouds of pollen blown by the winds through the valleys of chamonix. which takes us the valleys of chamonix. which takes us neatly to the weather forecast. in a moment the news at one with kate silverton. first the weather. this unusual heat has faded from many areas of the country but is still in the south—east where we will see the highest temperatures today, earlier we saw blue skies on the thames in surrey. in london the temperatures won't be far off from yesterday but getting cooler as the days go ahead, not much rain it should be said, temperatures near normal by the middle of the week. one area that has seen rain in northern ireland,
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in belfast and the north of the uk will be cooler, temperatures already lower than yesterday, 11 or 12 is quite cool for this time of year. we will find spells of rain around as well. so cooler air coming in from the west, the last of the heat across the eastern side of england we re across the eastern side of england were temperatures will hit 2627 degrees, cooler air coming were temperatures will hit 2627 degrees, coolerair coming in and behind this band of cloud outbreaks of rain mainly affecting the northern half of the uk, ahead of the rain could be sharp showers, the rain moving east is petering out, we should have clearer skies overnight, the winds dropping before the next band appears so tonight little cooler than last night, notably across scotland and the north—east of england. cooler air coming across scotland and the north—east of england. coolerair coming in across scotland and the north—east of england. cooler air coming in the atlantic, while we clear away one set of whether fronts another is coming in and after this push of cooler air from the west. as we start wednesday many places will be
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dry, there will be a fair bit of sunshine, we see the cloud building up, spreading out a little and we see thickening cloud bringing outbreaks of rain into northern ireland, moving into western scotla nd ireland, moving into western scotland over the irish sea into the north west of england and parts of wales. it's quite dry for this time of year, highs of 21, only 11 or 12, that weatherford pushes east during the evening and overnight and again as it moves eastwards, so the rain becomes lighter and much patchy again, a little bump of high pressure to the south means the south of the uk may get away with a dry day on thursday, although further north we are more likely to catch showers, heavy for a while in the north—west perhaps with hail and thunder before fading late in the day. these temperatures are better across the northern half of the uk, continuing to fall away across the south.
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all eyes on the united states as president trump prepares to announce whether he'll abandon a nuclear deal with iran. the international deal was seen by britain and other western allies — as the best way of stopping iran from developing a nuclear weapon but president trump has always been critical of the deal and threatened further sanctions — iran says it will continue to seek constructive relations with the world regardless. we'll have all the latest from washington. also this lunchtime. north korean leader, kimjong un, visits china for a second time to meet president xijinping in a surprise visit. borisjohnson describes one of downing street's plans for customs controls after brexit as ‘crazy‘. rail companies begin a public consultation aimed at making tickets fairer and easier to use.
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and — after a crazy promise to the press —
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